Syrian Medical Statistics - UOSSM-CANADA

# of Available Renal Dialysis Units In Syria:

# of Available Renal Dialysis Units In Syria: An inquiry was made about the availability of dialysis machines in hospitals, and the results are in the following figure: Continue reading

# of Physiotherapy Equipment In Syria

# of Physiotherapy Equipment In Syria: An inquiry was made about the availability of physiotherapy equipment in hospitals without raising the available hardware details, and referrals were as follows: Continue reading

# Of Available Blood Banks In Syria:

# Of Available Blood Banks In Syria: Continue reading

Qunaitra Hospital Research and Statistics

Qunaitra Hospital Research and Statistics: Quneitra (also Al Qunaytirah, Qunaitira, or Kuneitra; Arabic: القنيطرة‎ al-Qunayṭrah)[pronunciation?] is the largely destroyed and abandoned capitalof the Quneitra Governorate in south-western Syria. It is situated in a high valley in the Golan Heights at an elevation of 1,010 metres (3,313 feet)[1] above sea level. Quneitra was founded in the Ottoman era as a way station on the caravan route to Damascus and subsequently became a garrison town of some 20,000 people. Today, strategically located near the ceasefire line with Israeli-occupied territory. Its name is Arabic for "the little bridge".[3] On 10 June 1967, the last day of the Six-Day War, Quneitra came under Israeli control.[4] It was briefly recaptured by Syria during the 1973 Yom Kippur War, but Israel regained control in its subsequent counter-offensive. The city was almost completely destroyed before the Israeli withdrawal in June 1974. Syria had refused to rebuild the cixty and actively discouraged resettlement in the area. Israel was heavily criticized by the United Nations for the city's destruction,[5] while Israel has also criticized Syria for not rebuilding Quneitra.[6] It now lies in the demilitarized United Nations Disengagement Observer Force Zone between Syrian controlled territory and the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, a short distance from the crossing between the two sides, and is populated by only a handful of families. In 2004, its population was estimated at 153 persons, with some 4,000 more living in the surrounding areas of the former city. During the Syrian civil war, Quneitra became a clash point between rebel forces and Syrian Arab Army. As of 2014, it became controlled by the Syrian opposition.- Wikipedia Continue reading

Daraa Hospital Research and Statistics

Daraa Hospital Research and Statistics: Daraa (Arabic: درعا‎, Levantine Arabic: [ˈdarʕa]), also Darʿā, Dara’a, Deraa, Dera, and Derʿā ("fortress", compare Dura-Europos), is a city in southwestern Syria, located about 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) north of the border with Jordan.[3] It is the capital of Daraa Governorate, historically part of the ancient Hauran region. The city is located about 90 kilometres (56 mi) south of Damascus on the Damascus-Amman highway, and is used as a stopping station for travelers. Nearby localities include Umm al-Mayazen and Nasib to the southeast, al-Naimeh to the east, Ataman to the north, al-Yadudah to the northwest and Ramtha, Jordan to the southwest. According to the Syrian Central Bureau of Statistics, Daraa had a population of 97,969 in the 2004 census. It is the administrative center of a nahiyah ("sub-district") which contains eight localities with a collective population of 146,481 in 2004.[2] Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims.[4] Daraa became known as the "cradle of the revolution" [5] after protests at the arrest of 15 boys from prominent families for painting graffiti with anti-government slogans [6] sparked the beginning of Syrian Uprising of 2011.- Wikipedia Continue reading

# of Laboratory Equipment In Syria

 # of Laboratory Equipment In Syria: Most of the existing laboratory devices provided only basic analysis of hemoglobin, blood sugar, blood group, urea and creatinine. Almost half of the electrolyte analysis devices did not work. There were no hormone analysis devices in the operating hospitals. However,few private laboratory centers had these devices, which were costly and unaffordable.

Electric Generator Capacity and Fuel Consumption In Syrian Hospitals

Electric Generator Capacity and Fuel Consumption In Syrian Hospitals: Approximate depreciation schedule for generators of fuel: Continue reading

# of Operating Room Equipment In Syria

# of Operating Room Equipment In Syria: Operation Devices About 40% of the surveyed hospitals relied on portable operating lights, given the circumstances of the war, although the portable lights are less effective in hospitals, but easier to transport. However, 43 of all operating lights, fixed and portable, will require maintenance. There were a total of 35 anesthesia machines that will require maintenance, out of 226 anesthesia machines available. Traction tables that are used by orthopedic surgeon were 47. There were 33 hospitals that need such specialized tables, when an orthopedic surgeon is available.

Conclusions and Recommendations: Syrian Medical System

From the data obtained in this report we identified the need to: Incorporate regular updated data from hospitals inside Syria to build a strategic plan for delivery of health services as an integral part of all medical relief efforts, and increase donor confidence by providing real-time evidence of need for specific health services Set minimum requirements for the work volume of hospitals and to develop the health sector support based on these minimum standards. Analyze the health sector en bloc with the goal of providing quality, integrated health services for the largest number of patients Foster cooperation between all international and local organizations through joint ventures and coordination of services provided and sharing of data Campaign to increase financial support for critically limited health care human resources in Syria, with a focus on standardizing salary scales and expanding support for critical services and in areas of specific geographic needs, such areas as under siege Balance distribution of available resources as per work volume and results in light of the scarcity of donor resources Develop biomedical engineering capacity to leverage the large number of medical devices that are available in Syria but not in use due to maintenance and repair needs Augment capacity for documentation and information management to raise the ability of hospitals to continually improve the quality of health data maintenance Develop and expand training programs for cadres of health professionals based on geographic distribution of health needs Implement a proposed project to mobilize Oxygen generators with an appropriate geographical distribution to ensure the mobilization of oxygen cylinders needed for each area Launch a campaign to increase the number of infant incubators, specifically for the besieged hospitals in the Southern region of Syria, where occupancy rates revealed critical shortages Intiate a Project to expand intensive care capacity throughout Syrian hospitals with increased numbers of central oxygen generators and ventilators available Increase the capacity of our data collection team and research committee to regularly collect, audit and analyze health data from Syrian hospitals Future Plans: Planning for the next stage of data collection will take place in November 2015, and will include both follow-up on the core elements of this survey, as well as allow for the inclusion of additional survey inquiries to be implemented in February 2016 version The coming survey will focus on more detailed hospitals equipment status that came to light in the current survey including, for example, the types and capacity of ventilators available in various hospitals inside Syria Revisions will be made to the coding system used to capture the types and extent of injuries of patients presenting to Syrian hospitals Detailed surveys will be conducted on the implementation of dialysis inside Syria to include data on the number and type of dialysis units in operation, the number of hours of dialysis provided, the availability of desalination units, as well as the number of dialysis patients served by Syrian hospitals. A dedicated portion of the survey will focus on unmet need for biomedical engineering services to catalog all non-functional devices and categorize them by the type of malfunction and the feasibility for repair

# of Shared Equipment In Syria

# of Shared Equipment In Syria: There are devices that are used in more than one department, such as defibrillators and monitors, as well as, devices that provide services to the hospital, in general, such as electric generators, oxygen generators and other equipment. Results are summarized as follows: The total number of defibrillators was 214, of which 40 required maintenance. When matched with the number of hospitals having defibrillators, there were 3 hospitals in the suburbs of Damascus and 5 in the Northern region that did not have any defibrillator. The total number of monitors was 386, of which 66 required maintenance. This number does not cover the real needs, with regards to the number of ICU beds and the number of operating rooms. The number of dry and wet autoclaves was proportional to the number of hospitals, except for one hospital, which is inherently a non-surgical hospital. However, about 53 autoclave machines required maintenance. The number of suction devices that needed maintenance was 76, and the total number of devices relatively covered the needs of the hospitals. The number of nebulizer devices that required maintenance was 51 and the total number of devices relatively covered the needs of the hospitals. The number of crash carts was still relatively few and did not exceed 55 crash carts in all hospitals. However, the number of crash carts did not seem to have direct impact on the lives of the patients. As noted, the total number of central oxygen generators was 22, including 5 generators that required maintenance. This translates that most of the hospitals that have intensive care units of different kinds do not have oxygen generators. But rather, they depend on oxygen cylinders, which increase the financial burden and the need for extra cash to fill the cylinders and provide generators for packaging. This issue needs further analysis at provincial and regional levels, and study the possibility of filling the cylinders in each province. Acceptable number of ECG devices were available, of which 27 required maintenance. The availability of central oxygen generators, functional on non-functional, are mapped as follows: