Syrian Medical Statistics - UOSSM-CANADA

Damascus Hospital Research And Statistics

Damascus (Arabic: دمشق‎ Dimashq IPA: [ˈdiːmaːʃq]) is the capital and the second-largest city of Syria after Aleppo. It is commonly known in Syria as ash-Sham (Arabic: الشام‎ ash-Shām) and nicknamed as the City of Jasmine (Arabic: مدينة الياسمين‎ Madīnat al-Yāsmīn). In addition to being one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, Damascus is a major cultural and religious center of the Levant. The city has an estimated population of 1,711,000 as of 2009.[2] Located in southwestern Syria, Damascus is the center of a large metropolitan area of 2.6 million people (2004).[3] Geographically embedded on the eastern foothills of the Anti-Lebanon mountain range 80 kilometres (50 mi) inland from the eastern shore of the Mediterranean on a plateau 680 metres (2,230 ft) above sea level, Damascus experiences a semi-arid climate because of the rain shadow effect. The Barada River flows through Damascus. First settled in the second millennium BC, it was chosen as the capital of the Umayyad Caliphate from 661 to 750. After the victory of the Abbasid dynasty, the seat of Islamic power was moved to Baghdad. Damascus saw a political decline throughout the Abbasid era, only to regain significant importance in the Ayyubid and Mamluk periods. During Ottoman rule, the city decayed while maintaining a certain cultural prestige.[citation needed] Today, it is the seat of the central government and all of the government ministries.- Wikipedia On the Government Level - Only three hospitals were surveyed in Damascus city, which appear in blue part of this map Continue reading

Homs Hospital Research and Statistics

Homs (/hɔːms/;[2] Arabic: حمص‎ / ALA-LC: Ḥimṣ), previously known as Emesa (Greek: Ἔμεσα Emesa),[3] is a city in western Syria and the capital of the Homs Governorate. It is 501 metres (1,644 ft) above sea level and is located 162 kilometres (101 mi) north of Damascus.[4] Located on the Orontes River, Homs is also the central link between the interior cities and the Mediterranean coast. Before the Syrian war, Homs was a major industrial centre, and with a population of at least 652,609 people in 2004,[5] it was the third largest city in Syria after Aleppo to the north and the capital Damascus to the south. Its population reflects Syria's general religious diversity, composed mostly of Arabs Sunni Muslims and Alawite and Christian minorities. There are a number of historic mosques and churches in the city, and it is close to the Krak des Chevaliers castle, a world heritage site. Homs did not emerge into the historical record until the 1st century BCE at the time of the Seleucids. It later became the capital of a kingdom ruled by the Emesani dynasty who gave the city its name. Originally a center of worship for the sun god El-Gabal, it later gained importance in Christianity under the Byzantines. Homs was conquered by the Muslims in the 7th century and made capital of a district that bore its current name. Throughout the Islamic era, Muslim dynasties contending for control of Syria sought after Homs due to the city's strategic position in the area. Homs began to decline under the Ottomans and only in the 19th century did the city regain its economic importance when its cotton industry boomed. During French Mandate rule, the city became a center of insurrection and, after independence in 1946, a center of Baathistresistance to the first Syrian governments. In the ongoing Syrian civil war, Homs became an opposition stronghold and the Syrian government launched a military assault against the city in May 2011. The fighting left much of the city completely destroyed and thousands dead.- Wikipedia Continue reading

Aleppo Hospital Research And Statistics

In Aleppo Governrate 24 hospitals were surveyed in the northen, southren, and westren part only as the eastren part under ISS control and part of the maen city under governmental control. Aleppo (/əˈlɛpoʊ/; Arabic: ﺣﻠﺐ‎ / ALA-LC: Ḥalab, IPA: [ˈħalab]) is the largest city[citation needed] in Syria and it serves as the capital of the Aleppo Governorate, the most populous Syrian governorate.[4] With an official population of 2,132,100 (2004 census), it is also one of the largest cities in the Levant.[5][6] For centuries, Aleppo was the Syrian region's largest city and the Ottoman Empire's third-largest, after Constantinople and Cairo.[7][8][9] Aleppo is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world; it has been inhabited since perhaps as early as the 6th millennium BC.[10] Excavations at Tell as-Sawda and Tell al-Ansari, just south of the old city of Aleppo, show that the area was occupied since at least the latter part of the 3rd millennium BC;[11] and this is also when Aleppo is first mentioned in cuneiform tablets unearthed in Ebla and Mesopotamia, in which it is noted for its commercial and military proficiency.[12] Such a long history is probably due to its being a strategic trading point midway between the Mediterranean Sea and Mesopotamia (i.e. modern Iraq). The city's significance in history has been its location at the end of the Silk Road, which passed through central Asia and Mesopotamia. When the Suez Canal was inaugurated in 1869, trade was diverted to sea and Aleppo began its slow decline. At the fall of the Ottoman Empire after World War I, Aleppo ceded its northern hinterland to modern Turkey, as well as the important railway connecting it to Mosul. Then in the 1940s it lost its main access to the sea, Antioch and Alexandretta, also to Turkey. Finally, the isolation of Syria in the past few decades further exacerbated the situation, although perhaps it is this very decline that has helped to preserve the old city of Aleppo, its medieval architecture and traditional heritage. It won the title of the "Islamic Capital of Culture 2006", and has also witnessed a wave of successful restorations of its historic landmarks, until the start of the Syrian Civil War in 2011 and the Battle of Aleppo (2012–present) which resulted in grave destruction.- Wikipedia   Continue reading

Non-Surgical Medical Staff In Syria

Non-Surgical Medical Staff In Syria: The number of non-surgical staff did not reflect the precise number, as many of them worked outside the hospital in primary health care or private clinics. Continue reading

Human Resources In Syrian Hospitals:

Human Resources In Syrian Hospitals: Two types of questions were formulated according to hospital preference: 1. Number of medical staff 2. Detailed information about the hospital medical staff Such questionnaire purposed to know the real number of medical staff at the hospital and to know whether the staff were working in more than one hospital. Almost 64 % of the surveyed hospitals refused to give detailed information about their staff, primarily for security reasons, whereas 36 % hospital gave the information. Continue reading

Hospital Volume of Work in Syria

Hospital Volume of Work in Syria: We adopted several methods to estimate the volume of work in the services provided by the hospital. 1. Number of patients visiting emergency department and outpatient departments, in addition to, the number of emergency and non-emergency admissions.   Continue reading

Surgical Medical Staff In Syria

Surgical Medical Staff In Syria:  Continue reading

Hospitals Financial Support In Syria

Hospitals Financial Support In Syria: Staff support: Full support of the staff existed in 31 hospitals and partial support in 41 hospitals, while 41 hospitals reported no staff support,whatsoever. Support of running costs: About 34 hospitals had full support, 62 hospitals had partial support, while 17 hospitals had no support of their running costs. Most of the medical consumables were fully or partially supported. These results were based on direct answers by the surveyed hospitals and require further verification with the supporting organizations. Continue reading

Comparison with International Health Care Indicators

Comparison with International Health Care Indicators In Syria: Several indicators could be applied for evaluating health sectors and hospitals performance (1) Only few of them, which are applicable in our survey, were chosen: Continue reading